What Lyndhurst refers to as the lower landscape is the part of the estate that runs from the mansion to the Hudson River and includes historic rock outcroppings, an estate kitchen garden and pear orchard, a massive treehouse that has yet to be restored, and the historic bowling and recreation pavilion, built by Helen Gould in 1895.  This is the most historic area of Lyndhurst’s 67 acres, having elements that date back to the mid-1600s, when the estate was an early Dutch tenant farm.

A $1 million restoration of the lower landscape has been largely completed.  The central focus of the restoration was to restore a series of historic rock outcroppings and shaded seating areas and pathways that are likely the only surviving landscape designs of Alexander Jackson Davis, Lyndhurst’s architect. This part of the landscape now connects directly to a new southern extension of the Westchester County Riverwalk and the Old Croton Aqueduct in Irvington.

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Explore Lyndhurst’s 67-acre Estate

Purchase a Daily Grounds Pass to explore Lyndhurst’s majestic Hudson River setting at your own pace.